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Vol. 17, Issue 15 - April 9, 2018

'Sorry I'm late; My coffee was too hot' Abridged: Charlotte Business Journal

CHARLOTTE, NC - One in four employees is late to work at least once a month, according to a report from CareerBuilder. The majority of employees 63% believe adhering to a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedule is an antiquated practice, but 65% said they would stay late if they arrived late. CareerBuilder surveyed more than 800 private-sector employees and over 1,000 hiring and human resource managers.

Managers shared some tardiness excuses they've heard:

  • It's too cold to work.
  • My coffee was too hot and I couldn't leave until it cooled off.
  • An astrologer warned me of a car accident on a major highway, so I took all backroads
  • I was here, but I fell asleep in the parking lot.
  • My fake eyelashes were stuck together.
Supervisors with a chronically late employee should not hesitate to talk to them about the issue, said leadership expert Andy Stanley. If you want to build a culture of trust, you must confront fairly and quickly." Managers should handle an employee's lateness before other employees begin to show up late as well, according to Natural HR. The staff may become more relaxed with company rules if they notice a lack of consequences.

Career sites your resume should be posted on Staff Writer, The Career News

LOS ANGELES, CA -- Recruiters are reporting a higher numbers of positions to fill than in months past. And most are turning to career websites to instantly find qualified candidates currently on the market. However, with so many available candidates, and the large fees charged them by the biggest job boards, many hiring managers have turned to a variety of the smaller job boards to look for new employees.

So while it may take some time, posting your resume on ALL the best sites, large and small, is the best way to maximize your job opportunities. If you want the exposure but also want to avoid spending 60 hours filling out lots of web forms, consider letting a resume posting service do the work for you. Fill out just one easy form and in about 15 minutes you'll be posted on up to 78 top career sites like Careerbuilder, Job.net, Dice and more. A comprehensive list of all the sites they post to is on their home page.

Whether you do it by hand or use a resume posting service, creating accounts on all the best career sites will give you access to millions of jobs and exposure to 1.5 million employers and recruiters daily. Get your resume posted on all the top career sites at once. Try Resume Rabbit!

Develop resources to expedite the job search Abridged: Dale Carnegie

CLEVELAND, OH - Finding a new job can be a stressful process. Here's a few ideas to keep in mind during your job search:

Focus on your strengths. Focus on what you have to offer to that particular position. Many skills you have picked up in your past position are beneficial to any future jobs you pursue. These are your important assets that will help you stand out from the rest. Keep an open mind. When you read through job openings, reply to anything you find interesting. Research the company's Web site to see if there are other job openings it may have.

Network. Let people know you are searching for a position. Someone might have ideas, or may be able to put you in contact with someone who is hiring. It is important to use all of your resources. You may even consider attending a networking fair and meeting with career professionals from a variety of fields. Don't give up! It takes a lot of patience, as well as motivation, to stay confident in getting a new job. Keep your goals in mind, and remember that everything takes time.

Stay sharp so you can move ahead Abridged: Monster.com

WESTON, MA - If you think that years of industry experience, glowing references, and a stellar resume are enough to help you land your next job, think again. Whether you're employed and casually looking for other opportunities, or unemployed and anxiously trying to land a job, you must spend time each week learning and keeping your skills sharp.

Sounds easy, right? Well, you'd be surprised at how few people recognize the value of informal learning. This includes reading trade publications and industry-specific magazines, active networking, participating in listservs and user groups, and attending seminars and events.

It's not enough to rely on employers for training. In a ferociously competitive job market, you need to pay special attention to your own career development. Each week, you should spend at least a few hours reading about your industry, researching new trends and emerging technologies, and learning what it will take to manage your career more effectively. It should become as much a part of your daily routine as brushing your teeth or going to the gym.

[VIDEO] Ace your next interview to get hired faster Staff Writer, The Career News

LOS ANGELES, CA -- Did you know that when the job market was booming it took an average of 3 interviews to get 1 job offer? Now it takes 17! When you finally land the job interview of your dreams will you have what it takes to land the job offer? You must stand out during the job interview or you might as well be playing the lottery.

Most job seekers spend hours creating their resumes and cover letters, searching through job postings, reviewing classified ads and networking--all in order to land the job interview. Yet 99% of them don't have a clue what to do when they get one.

There's a little known "secret career document" you can quickly and easily customize for your next important job interview that literally forces the interviewer to picture you filling the position. This powerful technique was created by one of California's top marketing professionals. His method guarantees you'll automatically stand out from the crowd and shoot straight to the top of the "must hire" list for any position you seek. To ace your next interview and get hired faster visit: The Job Interview Secret.

Do's and Don'ts of handling interview silence Abridged: CareerBuilder.com

NEW YORK, NY - You're at a meeting or job interview. You've just answered a difficult question or made an important point and are met with an unmovable silence. You wait, growing a bit uneasy, but the room remains deafeningly still. Knowing what to say is important. Knowing when to stop is vital. To keep from talking yourself out of a job remember these Do's and Don'ts.

Do your homework beforehand. Anticipate questions that are likely to be asked and prepare brief (two minutes or less) compelling answers to each. Don't spend time talking about dates, chronology or other information readily available on your resume unless asked to do so. Do pause briefly before answering a difficult question to gather your thoughts. It not only helps you organize what you want to say, but will make you appear more sincere.

Do pay attention to verbal and non-verbal cues from the others in the room to gauge their reaction and adjust your responses accordingly. Do bring along a portfolio of successful projects (if applicable to your line of work) so that the interviewer can see and get a feel for the breadth of what you can do and ask about the projects which interest him or her. Become comfortable with silence. Remember, eloquence is saying the proper thing... And then stopping!

Need help with your resume? Get a free critique! Staff Writer, The Career News

NEW YORK, NY -- Did you know that the average job opening has 250 applicants competing for it? What's worse is 70% of those applicants will be eliminated from the candidate pool by an applicant tracking system. That means that only 30% of applicants make it to the desk of hiring managers. But, wait. It gets even worse!

Hiring managers use the 30 second test to eliminate 80% of the remaining candidates. That means, that on your first pass in front of the eyes of a hiring manager, you have less than 30 seconds to impress them. Career professionals like to call this the "applicant black hole." What many people don't realize is that they aren't even getting their resume into the hands of hiring managers for reading! What can you do to avoid the black hole?

Well, for starters, you need to realize that it isn't your skill-set or your accomplishments that are ruling you out, it's your resume! A self-written resume has a 6% chance of being read. A professionally written resume has a 60% chance of being read and generates 2-3x as many interviews as a self-written resume. The Career News has arranged a special deal with TopResume and is offering free resume evaluations. Their resume experts will read your resume and give you actionable tips that will instantly make your resume more professional. Get your free-resume critique from an experienced resume writer.

You've got the job. If only we could reach you. Abridged: Tips From An Employer

MILWAUKEE, WI -- Picture this. We loved your resume and want to interview you, but when we sent you an email telling you so, it bounced back. But wait, there's more. We call the phone number on your resume because we think you're perfect. But the number's disconnected. Hard to believe right? Think again! As employers we fail to contact viable job candidates who sent us their resume more than 25 percent of the time. The most common reasons are:

1. The email address is incorrect or the mailbox is full. 2. The phone number is disconnected or there's no voicemail. 3. Someone rude on the other end of the line refuses to take a message.

This happens so often that we don't spend too much time worrying about it and just move on to the next candidate. After sending your resume, it's important to leave email addresses and phone numbers in tact (or at least make forwarding information available). It's also important to get agreement from those you live with about how they'll handle your messages. Don't let these common problems prevent you from getting callbacks - make sure employers can reach you!

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