Past Issue

Vol. 16, Issue 21 - Week of May 22, 2017

Get your resume in front of the right people Abridged: USNews Money

NEW YORK, NY -- 1) Don't give up on broken links. If you encounter one, or if you encounter an online application with errors, freezes or restarts every five minutes, don't panic. Find another way. Go to the company website, locate a staff directory, find the head of the department or the head of HR, and send a personal application to that person.

2) Customize your cover letter. Conduct some research to find out who's on the other end of the email address you're being asked to submit to. Then find out what you can about this person including a quick LinkedIn search to see if the two of you share any professional contacts. Target your letter to this person and tailor it to her specific needs. 3) Submit your letter to the department or team most relevant to the position. Some candidates copy their message to the HR director or the CEO of the entire company (this isn't usually necessary, but it can't hurt to cover every base.)

4) Follow up means everything. The best way to find out if your resume reached its target is to simply ask. Send an email or make a quick phone call to the person on the other end and find a polite, respectful, and brief way to confirm that your resume was received. If you don't get a clear response, call again the following day.

Work smarter and land a job over the competition Staff Writer, The Career News

LOS ANGELES, CA -- These days, to land a job over the competition, you have to work smarter. The hard part is to get your resume read by the right people at the right time. Good jobs aren't on the market very long. To succeed your resume has to be available to the employer the moment they decide to fill a position.

One easy way to be found by employers who are looking to hire someone with your skills, is to post your resume on all the top job sites and niche job boards. This is a proven, documented method of successful job searching. While it may take a fair amount of time to find and fill out the forms of all these sites, you will definitely multiply your chances of landing a job.

If you want all the benefits without all the work, you can let a service like Resume Rabbit do it for you. You fill out one simple form and they'll instantly post your resume on up to 85 top job sites like CareerBuilder, Job.com, Careercast, Dice & more. Then you'll be seen by over 1.5 million employers & recruiters daily. It takes ONLY 5 minutes and saves 60 hours of research and data entry. Instantly post your resume on all the top job sites, to find a job faster.

Four good reasons to revise your resume today Abridged: Monster

LAS VEGAS, NV -- For some folks, updating a resume is as much fun as getting a tooth pulled. But keeping your resume current is painful only when you haven't done it for a very long time. Here are four reasons you should revise your resume today.

The 'Crazy' Trap Lurks: If you're sending out the same resume over and over yet not getting any response from employers, your resume needs help. Revise it to see different results. Nothing Stays the Same: Even if you've held the same job for the past three years, your resume shouldn't look the same. If your responsibilities at your job have remained static, perhaps the technology you use has not. Indicate that on your resume. If nothing truly has changed at all, it may be time to take on some new responsibilities or learn new skills.

Do You Know Where You're Going? Your resume is a road map of where you've been -- and it's a good indicator of where you're headed. Updating it frequently will help you remain connected to what's on the map and where you are in your career. Snooze, and You Lose: When opportunity knocks, be ready to respond at a moment's notice. There's no better way to introduce a careless mistake into your resume than by updating it at the last minute. Revise it now, and take your time. Don't ruin your chance to impress a potential employer.

Reasons to have someone else proof your resume Abridged: Grammarly

SAN FRANCISCO, CA -- You'll never catch everything. It never fails--you've read your resume hundreds of times, but there's always that one mistake that falls into your blind spot. Other proofreaders will catch that one mistake you're overlooking, saving you from countless employment rejections.

You don't know what to cut. If you need to cut down on the length of your resume, yet you can't choose anything to get rid of, a friend or professional resume writer with a critical eye will help you separate the wheat from the chaff, concentrating the best parts of your resume onto one page. Form is just as important as function. You may have a very well-written resume, but if it doesn't look nice, you'll lose valuable points with employers. Remove unnecessary formatting, reorder information so it flows better, leave lots of white space, and wow employers with your easy-to-read, impressively simple document.

You're burying the lead. Employers expect the most important information to be at the top. Another set of eyes can help you pinpoint what's important in that top area, and what can be shifted downward or removed. You may be too industry-centric. If your job is technical or includes lots of jargon, your resume may not make sense to general recruiters or human resource professionals. Ask someone outside of your profession to read your resume and point out anything that they don't understand.

Need help with your resume? Get a free critique! Staff Writer, The Career News

NEW YORK, NY -- Did you know that the average job opening has 250 applicants competing for it? What's worse is 70% of those applicants will be eliminated from the candidate pool by an applicant tracking system. That means that only 30% of applicants make it to the desk of hiring managers. But, wait. It gets even worse!

Hiring managers use the 30 second test to eliminate 80% of the remaining candidates. That means, that on your first pass in front of the eyes of a hiring manager, you have less than 30 seconds to impress them. Career professionals like to call this the "applicant black hole." What many people don't realize is that they aren't even getting their resume into the hands of hiring managers for reading! What can you do to avoid the black hole?

Well, for starters, you need to realize that it isn't your skill-set or your accomplishments that are ruling you out, it's your resume! A self-written resume has a 6% chance of being read. A professionally written resume has a 60% chance of being read and generates 2-3x as many interviews as a self-written resume. The Career News has arranged a special deal with TopResume and is offering free resume evaluations. Their resume experts will read your resume and give you actionable tips that will instantly make your resume more professional. Get your free-resume critique from an experienced resume writer.

5 Reasons to quit your job Abridged: Forbes

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- 1) If your current job is physically or emotionally unsafe, you have to get out. If you're being mistreated at work and you can prove it, you may be able to quit your job and still receive unemployment compensation.

2) If your current job is making you ill, you may be able to take a medical leave of absence from your job on the basis of stress or another condition created at work. If your job is making you sick, you have to get out. 3) If you have a friend or relative who could employ you while you work out your next move, grab that opportunity! You may not have another "career-type" job ready to walk into, but you'll have an income and a place to go during the day, and those are two important pieces of the puzzle.

4) If you already know you can consult or work on contract gigs, quit your toxic job and rev up your contract consulting engine. Any income is better than none. 5) If you know you won't have the time, focus or peace of mind to launch a productive job search as long as you're stuck in your current unhappy work situation, then quit. You may have to slice your expenses to the bone and/or take a survival job, but you cannot stay trapped in the hamster wheel forever!

Get help finding a recruiter in your industry Staff Writer, The Career News

LOS, ANGELES, CA -- When looking for a job, you may want to consider networking with a recruiter. Recruiters, otherwise known as head hunters or search consultants, are hired by companies to find candidates for them, and often know about unadvertised jobs.

It's important to note, that recruiters do not charge the job seeker. The company pays a fee, typically when a candidate is hired. When contacting a recruiter send a resume and cover letter just as though you were applying for a job. If a recruiter calls you, always call back - even if you are not currently job hunting. You never know when circumstances might change and you might need job search assistance.

If you don't know of any good recruiters and/or want to instantly have your resume sent to 1000's of recruiters that specialize in people with your skills, we have a suggestion for you! One service, Resume Mailman, can email your resume to 1000's of targeted recruiters. Resume Mailman asks you to fill out some general information and input your resume. Then, your information is delivered to recruiters who specialize in finding jobs for people with your skills, in your area! Get your resume delivered to recruiters in your industry today.

Tips to help you land a job interview Abridged: CareerCast

CARLSBAD, CA -- Apply to Lots of Jobs and Don't Stop Applying: Workers that get hired apply to twice as many jobs as those that do not get hired. Don't just shotgun your resume to everyone. Take the time to try different tactics in your cover letter and resume and see what yields results. Also, just because you have some interviews lined up doesn't mean you should stop applying to jobs. You may not get hired and you don't want to be stuck starting from scratch. Continue to create a pipeline of potential options.

Track Your Progress and Results: This may seem like overkill, but it is essential to giving you an edge. This way when you do get a positive response like an interview or follow up, you can track it back to what job and what you actually sent them. Target Your Cover Letter: It's OK to have a template cover letter as a start point, but it's critical that you modify it for each job you apply to.

Target Your Resume: If you're applying to different types of jobs, make sure you have at least two different versions of your resume. Highlight your most relevant experience and make sure you tailor it to the job you are applying to. Follow Up On Each Application: All you need to do is send a quick note 3-5 days after you applied, and ask if they have received your resume.

Have you tried this new job search engine yet? Staff Writer, The Career News

LOS ANGELES, CA -- If you've recently been searching online for a job, you realize there are literally thousands of different websites all listing potential job matches for you. Amazingly enough, even the biggest employment sites have less than 10% of available jobs listed online. Yet finding and then searching through thousands of different job boards and company websites is nearly impossible. Conversely, overlooking any one of these sites could cause you to miss out on the job of your dreams.

Wouldn't it be great if you could search all online job listings from just one website? Well you finally can, with a new job search engine at JobsWanted.com. This site works just like Google, Yahoo or Bing, except it searches only for targeted job listings from sites like: CareerBuilder, Beyond.com, Job.com, SimplyHired, Jobs2Careers, and more.

You simply plug in your job title and desired location, and in seconds you can review all your best job matches pulled from all the top job sites -- and all in one place. Now instead of spending endless hours bouncing around to countless different job sites, the jobs are brought right to you in seconds. The best part is there's no charge for this service, no sign up required, and you can try it right now for free.

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